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Vragen
1: Testing
2: Wat zijn hybride wolven?
3: What are Wolves?
4: How Big are Wolves?
5: Do Wolves Live Alone?
6: Why Do Wolves Howl?
7: What Does Rank Order Mean?
8: When Are Pups Born?
9: Are Wolves Dangerous To People?
10: Why Do Some People Dislike Wolves?

Vr. 1: Testing
Antw. 1: Testing antwoord.. Ik ben bezig met een FAQ voor Wolven.KLUP.nl :) PS: Alle antwoorden die in het engels zijn, zijn niet copyrighted door mij en zijn alleen maar voor 'testing purposes'.

Vr. 2: Wat zijn hybride wolven?
Antw. 2: Dat zijn wolven die "gemaakt" zijn door 1 hond en 1 wolf. Ze hebben dus ook de helft van de eigenschappen van de wolven en de helft van de eigenschappen van de wolven.

Vr. 3: What are Wolves?
Antw. 3: Wolves are large, powerful, graceful wild canines which were once common throughout North America, Europe, and Asia, but now live mostly in remote wilderness.

Vr. 4: How Big are Wolves?
Antw. 4: Most adult male wolves weigh between 80 to 110 pounds, with females usually weighing 10 to 20 pounds less. They may stand up to 32 inches high at the shoulder, and are often 6 to 6 1/2 feet from nose to tail. They usually weigh 15 to 20 pounds more in the winter than in the summer due to a heavier fur coat, among other things.

Vr. 5: Do Wolves Live Alone?
Antw. 5: Wolves are social animals, living together in family groups called packs. In order to live together peacefully, they have an elaborate system of rank order. Just as an Army private has to obey sergeants, and both of them follow orders from a general, low-ranking wolves must defer or submit to higher-ranking ones. This keeps order within the pack and minimizes fighting.

Vr. 6: Why Do Wolves Howl?
Antw. 6: Wolves howl for a variety of reasons. A pack will howl to advertise their presence and mark their territory (they will also use urine to scent-mark their territory). Pack members can recognize each other's howls, so when they are separated, they can locate each other. A group howl will often lead to a rally, where pack members gather around, nuzzle, and greet a high-ranking wolf -- most often the alpha male or female. Sometimes wolves just howl for reasons we don't fully understand.

Vr. 7: What Does Rank Order Mean?
Antw. 7: Each pack has a top male, called the alpha male, who submits to no one and to whom all the other males defer. Likewise, there is an alpha female, to whom all other females must submit. Next in rank to the alphas are the beta male and beta female. For each gender, every wolf has a rank or place in line where they must submit to anyone higher than they are, but can bully or dominate the wolves lower in rank. At the bottom there is an omega male and omega female. These wolves have no one under them and may be harassed to the point where they disperse, or leave the pack. If they are very lucky and find a mate, and if there is enough territory available for them, they might be able to start a new pack of their own. Within the pack, wolves will constantly demonstrate their rank. When two wolves in the pak meet, the higher-ranking one will show aggression and confidence by raising its tail, putting its ears forward, lifting its lips in a snarl, and making itself look as big and threatening as possible. The hackles, the fur along the top of its back, will go up automatically when a wolf is threatening a lower-ranking one. The subordinate, or lower-ranking wolf, tries to make itself look small and non-threatening. Its tail will be tucked under its belly, ears laid back flat, and it will roll over and submit to the higher-ranking wolf, licking its muzzle and "letting it know that it's boss." In almost all cases, this ritual substitutes for actual fighting. If wolves often fought and hurt each other, they might be too injured to be able to hunt and survive.

Vr. 8: When Are Pups Born?
Antw. 8: Usually in April. Wolves have one breeding season each year, from mid- January to the end of February. Sixty-three days after mating, the mother wolf will have an average of four to six pups, born in an underground den she has dug. The pups weigh only about one pound each at birth, and cannot see, hear, smell, or keep warm by themselves. The mother feeds them her milk, and other pack members bring food to the den for her to eat. The pups' eyes open after about 10 days. Around three weeks after birth, the pups begin to explore outside the den. Sometimes the mother carries the pups to another den to guard them from harm. When the pups are a little older, they are left at rendezvous sites, usually with an adult "baby-sitter," while the rest of the pack hunts for food. By fall, the pups are about 80 percent of their adult size, and are able to travel with the pack as they hunt throughout the winter. Are Wolves Dangerous To People? No. Wolves are very shy animals, and are afraid of people, avoiding us whenever possible. Even though people are expanding into the few remaining areas where wolves are found in large numbers, there has *never* been a documented case of a healthy wild wolf deliberately attacking a person in North America. Some people try to keep wolves, or wolf-dog mixes known as "wolf hybrids," as pets. Many think that if they raise a wolf pup with love and treat it like a dog, it will grow up to be a loyal pet and fierce watchdog. The problem is that they see the many similarities between wolves and dogs, and ignore the vital differences. Although dogs originally developed from wolves, it occurred by selective breeding for thousands of generations that actually altered the genetic makeup of the animal. This changed the animal's innate or "built-in" behavior to make it suitable for living with people in a home. The behavior of wolves, and of many wolf hybrids, which enables them to survive in the wild, makes them unsuitable as a pet. Dishonest people often sell northern-breed dog mixes as "wolf-hybrids" when they actually have little or no wolf in them. Because these dogs may be wonderful pets, many people refuse to believe that wolf hybrids need special handling. Sometimes these misguided people later get a real hybrid and cannot safely handle it. Often, when people do try to treat them as if they were dogs, the animals end up in a situation where their normal behavior results in an attack, sometimes fatally injuring someone. The animals are almost invariably killed, and the image of an entire endangered species suffers. How Can I Learn More About Wolves? Here at Wolf Park, we keep wolves in captivity -- not as pets, but as ambassadors for their species. Through visits and school tours, adults and children alike see our main pack in a large (over six acres), naturalistic enclosure, and learn about wolves and their behavior. There are a number of other facilities that have captive wolves, and many zoos have wolf exhibits. If you have a chance to visit such places, spend some time watching the wolves and try to figure out their rank order by noticing which wolves submit to others, and which submit to no other wolves. Try to visit either as soon as the facility opens or in the late afternoon/early evening, since wolves are crepuscular, meaning that they are most active around dawn and dusk, and often rest during most of the middle of the day and night.

Vr. 9: Are Wolves Dangerous To People?
Antw. 9: No. Wolves are very shy animals, and are afraid of people, avoiding us whenever possible. Even though people are expanding into the few remaining areas where wolves are found in large numbers, there has *never* been a documented case of a healthy wild wolf deliberately attacking a person in North America. Some people try to keep wolves, or wolf-dog mixes known as "wolf hybrids," as pets. Many think that if they raise a wolf pup with love and treat it like a dog, it will grow up to be a loyal pet and fierce watchdog. The problem is that they see the many similarities between wolves and dogs, and ignore the vital differences. Although dogs originally developed from wolves, it occurred by selective breeding for thousands of generations that actually altered the genetic makeup of the animal. This changed the animal's innate or "built-in" behavior to make it suitable for living with people in a home. The behavior of wolves, and of many wolf hybrids, which enables them to survive in the wild, makes them unsuitable as a pet. Dishonest people often sell northern-breed dog mixes as "wolf-hybrids" when they actually have little or no wolf in them. Because these dogs may be wonderful pets, many people refuse to believe that wolf hybrids need special handling. Sometimes these misguided people later get a real hybrid and cannot safely handle it. Often, when people do try to treat them as if they were dogs, the animals end up in a situation where their normal behavior results in an attack, sometimes fatally injuring someone. The animals are almost invariably killed, and the image of an entire endangered species suffers.

Vr. 10: Why Do Some People Dislike Wolves?
Antw. 10: Many people fear and hate wolves. Ranchers worry that wolves will kill their livestock. In areas like Yellowstone National Park, where people killed off the existing wolf population and where a reintroduction of gray wolves is beginning, private groups have set up funds to compensate ranchers for any proven stock losses to wolves. In Minnesota, where wolves live in close proximity to livestock already, fewer than one percent of farms report any losses at all. With proper livestock management techniques, including the use of livestock guarding dogs, wolves can be reintroduced without economic hardship to farmers and ranchers. Unfortunately, people still believe old stories and fables about wolves. Tales like "Little Red Riding Hood" and contemporary werewolf horror films paint the wolf in a negative manner and only increase fear and hatred for those who cannot separate the fictional image from the real animal.

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